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Unleash the Beast: General Nexus 5 Hackery

Started by dmmarck ,
google nexus nexus 5 rom flashing rooting hacking unlocking bootloader

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dmmarck #1

dmmarck
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Posted Nov 4 '13 @ 4:06 PM

The Nexus 5 is not only the most powerful Nexus phone to date, but arguably the first Nexus phone to have top-of-the-line, cutting edge specifications.  So clearly, you're not going to leave it stock, right?  See, the beauty of hacking a Nexus is threefold.  First, it's ridiculously simple if you have a moderate understanding of fastboot, adb, and common hackery terms.  Second, the next person to actually brick a Nexus will be the first.  And finally, the "exit plan" for the Nexus line is unrivaled--just flash stock images and have a drink.  No worries about finding a RUU executable or using some polytheistic downloader.
 
So if you really want to get down and dirty with the Nexus, the absolute first thing you should do before you even sign-in to your Google account is unlock the bootloader.
 

WARNING

Neither myself nor The Android Channel are responsible for your actions, your device, or the combination of the two. While Nexus devices are hard to brick, shit happens. Ultimately, you--and you alone--must accept full responsibility for anything that happens (good or bad), including the potential voiding of your device's warranty. Hacking is fun, but there is always risk. Unfortunately, you assume that risk by continuing down the path elaborated below.

 

Unlocking the Nexus 5's Bootloader

 
The bootloader is the key to flashing "images" on the Nexus.  These images can be recoveries (further used for hackery), kernels (the piece of software that controls hardware/software interaction), radios/basebands (the software that connects you to networks), and other system images.  Unfortunately, unlocking the bootloader completely erases everything on your device--including stuff on the faux "SDcard" partition.  So if you have saved 600 pictures of cats from Reddit, say goodbye to them.  Because of this, I recommend unlocking the bootloader as soon as you have the device in hand.
 
To unlock the bootloader, you generally have two options--use a toolkit or use fastboot.  Fastboot requires having the fastboot.exe (included in the Android SDK) on your machine as well as device drivers so that your phone can communicate with a computer via the USB port.  If you have a Mac, all you need is the fastboot.exe--no drivers necessary.  

 

Once you have the drivers and fastboot.exe, simply boot your Nexus 5 to the bootloader screen (from SCREEN OFF, hold down the POWER BUTTON AND VOLUME DOWN BUTTON SIMULTANEOUSLY), plug it into the computer, open a Command Prompt or Terminal, change the directory to the fastboot.exe location, and enter the following command:

$ fastboot oem unlock

This command will prompt a screen asking if you would like to unlock; use the volume keys to navigate to your option (which should be yes ;)), then use the power button to select.

 

INFO

If you require further assistance with fastboot, please scroll down a bit. If you still have questions, please do not hesitate to ask within this thread!

 
Now, as stated earlier, this will wipe your device.  Everything.  Pictures, accounts, downloaded apps.  The whole nine, so to speak.  So it is best to do this as early as possible.
 

bootloader.jpg

Once unlocked, simply reboot the device and sign-in.  Market Restore should work fairly quickly, and soon enough you will have all of your apps, contacts, and the like.
 

Flashing Images with Fastboot

 

Unlocking your Nexus 5's bootloader gave you the veritable "keys to the kingdom."  Now, you can use your shiny new unlocked bootloader, a USB cable, and Command Prompt/Terminal to make some magic.

 

NOTE

If you need fastboot and do not want to download the Android SDK, please use the following: 
  • If you have a Mac, please go here and download this package.

    • Please make note of the fastboot prefix - ./fastboot - which will replace the ordinary prefix ("fastboot").

  • If you have Windows, please go here and download this package.

 

The most popular use for fastboot, at least for the amateur ROM enthusiast, is arguably the installation of a custom recovery.  Custom recoveries allow you to flash (i.e. install) zip packages (usually in the form of roms, themes, and other goodies).  For the past 2 years or so, two recoveries have dominated the Android scene:  ClockworkMod Recovery ("CWM") and Team Win Recovery Project ("TWRP").
 
Before we get to the recovery, let me explain some fastboot concepts:

  • First, fastboot acts as a link between device and computer.  The device, however, must be in "fastboot mode."  For the Nexus, this mode is the bootloader.  Therefore, before you contemplate using fastboot, make sure you reboot your device into the bootloader.
  • Second, make sure you have your fastboot drivers downloaded and ready (if you're on a Windows machine).  While drivers are somewhat outside the scope of this guide, the best way to check is to get to fastboot mode, connect your device to a computer via USB, cd to the fastboot directory, and type: 
    $ fastboot devices
    
    Press enter (as with any and every command in Command Prompt/Terminal).  If a string of numbers shows up, huzzah, you are ready to rock!  If not, you must reinstall (or install) the device drivers.
  • Third, fastboot commands follow a similar structure.  Generally, the structure is as follows: 
    $ fastboot [ <option> ] <command>
    
    Therefore, you always use the fastboot "prefix" when entering a fastboot command.  "Options" like "-w" (wipe) are less frequently used than the commands, so for our purposes, we will only focus on the commands.  Accordingly, the most frequent command is the "flash" command, or: 
    flash <partition> [ <filename> ]
    
    Therefore, putting it all together, the most frequent fastboot command used is this: 
    $ fastboot flash <partition> [ <filename> ]
    
    Here, the "partition" may be, among other things, the "recovery" (for the custom recoveries) or "boot" (the kernel).  Thus, you want to "point" fastboot to where you are installing, and then use the filename (including the .img file extension) to define what you are installing.
  • Fourth, make it easy on yourself and put all fastboot items into the folder in which the fastboot.exe is located.  Therefore, you only need to change directory ("cd") once and everything is neat and organized.

Custom Recoveries

 
Once you understand flashing images with fastboot, you're ready to install a recovery.  As stated above, the two prime recoveries are CWM and TWRP.  While you can install these recoveries through alternate methods (GooManager will install TWRP, ROM Manager will install CWM), fastbooting the images is a piece of cake.

  • Download the recovery image.  Be sure to only download a recovery explicitly for the Nexus 5--which should be "Hammerhead" if purchased through Google Play.
  • Place the recovery image in the folder that contains your fastboot.exe.
  • OPTIONAL:  Some folks rename the recover image's filename.  You can; or, alternatively, you can just use it as is.
  • Reboot the Nexus 5 into the bootloader.
  • Connect the Nexus 5 via USB cable to your computer.
  • Open Command Prompt/Terminal, and then change directory to the fastboot folder.  Use this command: 
    $ cd [ <location> ]
    
    For example, if it's C:\AwesomeAndroidFolder . . . 
    $ cd C:\AwesomeAndroidFolder
  • Make sure your device is recognized by fastboot: 
    $ fastboot devices
  • Enter the fastboot command: 
    $ fastboot flash recovery [ <filename> ]
    
    For example, it should look like this: 
    $ fastboot flash recovery CWMrecoveryfilename.img
  • Now, once installed, you will have full use of the custom recovery.  You can boot into it at this point to look around, or you can reboot your system.  To get to the recovery, go through the bootloader--reboot into it and scroll to "recovery," press power, and the recovery should load.  You may also get there with adb using the following command when your phone is on and USB debugging is enabled
    $ adb reboot recovery

TIP

Sometimes you screw up and you "lose" recovery. If you try rebooting into the recovery and you see an Android with a fearsome red triangle over it, that means the stock recovery remains and the custom recovery is gone. Simply follow the above steps to reflash the custom recovery.

 

Flashing ROMs

 
Flashing a ROM is one of the great joys Apple users will never enjoy.  See, when they want to mess with their phone, they are constrained by the fact that iOS is completely closed source.  They can change some things, like adding settings and changing the look with themes, but in large part, "jailbreaking" only gets you so far.  Because Android is open source, the code is just floating out there in the stars waiting for eager minds to pull it down and bring it to users like you.
 
Generally, a ROM changes your OS.  It may change your Android version, e.g. from Android 4.3 (Jelly Bean) to Android 4.4 (KitKat).  But usually, it's built from the latest available Android version and includes custom options, tweaks, and optimizations.  In the Nexus community, there are a few big ROMs/developer groups--Paranoid Android, Android Open Kang Project ("AOKP"), and CyanogenMod ("CM").  Depsite those, there are dozens of custom-built ROMs by smaller groups and individual developers.  On a Nexus, the choice of ROM could literally be endless.
 
ROMs come in two general packages.  The first, and now less common package, is a single zip package containing the ROM and the necessary Google Applications ("GAPPS").  The second and most prominent package is actually two zips, the ROM and the GAPPs.  If you enjoy using Google Play services with your device, you must have GAPPs.
 
ROM installation is ridiculously easy.  Generally, there are two methods.  The first method--which uses a full wipe--is recommended for any ROM that (i) you are unsure of; (ii) is completely new to you, and not just an iterative update of your present ROM (i.e. it is not a "nightly" build of your current ROM); (iii) requires extensive testing; (iv) is a new Android version; and (v) is recommended by the developer to be flashed with a full, clean wipe.  The general rule of thumb for full wiping is this:
 

When in doubt, wipe the entire bloody thing.

 
Full Wipe/Clean Flash

  • Download the ROM and GAPPs packages.  Please, please, please make sure these files are for your device--Hammerhead.  Also, be sure to verify the MD5s of the downloads to ensure that you did not inadvertently download a corrupt or inappropriate file.
  • Transfer the ROM and GAPPs packages to your internal storage.  I usually use a folder named "GLORIOUS ROMAGE," because flashing is awesome.
  • Reboot into the recovery.
  • Create a backup of your current ROM or setup, using the options and prompts available to you in recovery.  I highly recommend having one verified working backup (also called a "nandroid") on my device at any given moment, just in case.
  • Perform a "factory reset" wipe.  This means you must wipe the data, cache, system, and dalvik cache.  Please note that most--if not all--ROMs will wipe the system for you.  Do not wipe internal storage.  If you really like wiping (and really, who doesn't?), wipe 3-7 times.  I do it because I'm paranoid and I have anxiety levels that rival many small-time tyrants.
  • Once wiped, locate the "install from SDcard" or "install zip" option in recovery.
  • Find the ROM zip and install the ROM.  Do not install GAPPs first, for the ROMs install script will wipe the system partition, and thus wipe the GAPPs.
  • Find the GAPPs zip and install the GAPPs.  Note that if you use TWRP, you can create an "install queue" where you can stack multiple zips for installation.  Just like the above, make sure you install the ROM first.
  • OPTIONAL:  some people like wiping the cache and dalvik cache after the installation procedure.  Depending on the given levels of caffeine, adrenaline, and anxiety coursing through my veins, I do too.  It is, however, your call.
  • Reboot the system, sign in to Google, and set up your device. 

Now, if you are simply installing an iterative update (nightly), you can get away with a partial wipe or a dirty flash.  This procedure is slightly different, although the warnings  and advice stated above still apply.
 
Partial Wipe/Dirty Flash

  • Download the ROM and GAPPs packages.  Because this is an iterative update, you may already have the latest GAPPs package on your phone.  If that's the case, there's no reason to download another.
  • Transfer the ROM and GAPPs packages to your internal storage.
  • Reboot into the recovery.
  • Create a backup of your current ROM or setup.
  • Perform a partial wipe.  This means you must wipe the cache, system, and dalvik cache.  Do not wipe internal storage
  • Once wiped, locate the "install from SDcard" or "install zip" option in recovery.
  • Find the ROM zip and install the ROM.
  • Find the GAPPs zip and install the GAPPs.
  • OPTIONAL:  post-install cache and dalvik cache wipes.
  • Reboot the system and your data and apps will remain as it was before.

Remember though--if you have any doubt, perform a full wipe.  Usually, if issues or bugs or force closes creep up after a ROM install, such issues are first attributed to not performing a full wipe.  As a matter of general courtesy, do not report minor bugs to developers if such bugs are encountered after a dirty flash.

 

For now, the above tools should help you to customize your Nexus extensively.  The Nexus has--and always will have--incredible ROM and kernel developer support.  Its ease of access and malleability arguably makes it the most customizable phone in existence, and folks the world over take advantage of that.  Be sure to enjoy this experience, but as always, be careful and double check each and every step along the way.  Before you know it, you'll be wiping dalvik and fastbooting with ease and confidence.

 

INFO

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to ask us in this thread.  We're here for you.  This thread will be updated as more information and resources become available, so please check back!

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UNLEASH THE BEAST: General Nexus 5 Hackery


LG NEXUS 5 - Black 16GB, Android 4.4 KitKat, Unlocked, Rooted, franco.Kernel

ASUS NEXUS 7 (2013) - Black 16GB, Android 4.3 Jelly Bean, Unlocked

 


creccaj #2

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Posted Nov 4 '13 @ 4:07 PM

WARNING

Neither myself nor The Android Channel are responsible for your actions, your device, or the combination of the two. While Nexus devices are hard to brick, shit happens. Ultimately, you--and you alone--must accept full responsibility for anything that happens (good or bad), including the potential voiding of your device's warranty. Hacking is fun, but there is always risk. Unfortunately, you assume that risk by continuing down the path elaborated below.

 

 

Rooting vs. Unlocking

 

So now that you are unlocked thank's to the help of Dmmarck what's next?  Naturally, rooting would be the next thing that comes to mind.  If you plan to keep stock, rooting your device could be a good way to further customize your shiny new Nexus without flashing ROMs.  That being said, there is a big misconception between unlocking and rooting.  Lets fix that right now with a short explanation of both...

 

Unlocking:  Unlocking essentially unlocks your entire device to do almost anything that you want.  If you don't unlock your device you can't flash ROMs/Kernels/Radios or anything that alters the boot procedures of your device.  Please see the original post for more information regarding unlocking.

 

Rooting:  Rooting basically gives you admin access to your phone's OS and entire file system, allowing you to tweak settings while operating within the OS.  What does this mean?  Well this means you can tweak kernel settings (with apps like SetCPU), block ads, delete/freeze system applications, and apply themes.  Items like this don't require you to be unlocked because it does not alter the boot procedures of your phone since nothing is active from root until your device is loaded up to the OS.  

 

Think of it in terms of a computer OS.  When you first boot your phone up out of the box and get to your home screen, you are basically using the phone as a "Guest Account."  That means you can access all necessary functions but have restrictions to what you can modify, add or delete.  If you root your device, this will give you "Admin access" (a/k/a "superuser" permissions), meaning you will be able to modify, add or delete OS process, application or items at will.  Going along with the compute analogy, unlocking your bootloader can be compared to going into your system's BIOS and altering how the computer loads from the second you hit the power button.

 

Rooting the Nexus 5

 

"Yea, yea enough with the talk, just tell me how to root the damn thing already!"  That is why you came here I assume right?  Well lucky for you all, before the Nexus 5 was even out for sale, XDA Senior Moderator Chainfire posted a root method.  Fast, huh?  Before I continue on, I do have to put a disclaimer here:

 

NOTE

I did not help, contribute or work on this root method that Chainfire has released.  I am simply posting the process here for the purpose of this guide.  All credit should be given to Chainfire over on XDA.

 

Thankfully, Chainfire posted 3 ways to root your phone--Windows, Max OS and Linux.  So no matter what OS you have, you are covered.  Below you can find Chainfire post on XDA that instructs you how to root your device.  Take note that if you DID NOT unlock your device, this process will wipe you phone.  As of right now, there is no way around that.  My suggestion to you is unlock your phone anyway even if you plan to never flash a ROM or Kernel.  Unlocking your device will not negatively affect your phone in any way, it just leaves the option open to you if you ever decide to flash something in the future without having to wipe you phone and start over.  

 

 

Download

CF-Auto-Root-hammerhead-hammerhead-nexus5.zip

 

What's installed
- SuperSU binary and APK
- Nothing else, that's it.

Installation and usage

- Download the ZIP file (see post below for link)
- Extract the ZIP file
- Boot your device in bootloader/fastboot mode. Usually this can be done by turning your device off, then holding VolUp+VolDown+Power to turn it on.
- Connect your device to your computer using USB

- Windows:
--- Run root-windows.bat

- Linux
--- chmod +x root-linux.sh
--- Run root-linux.sh

- Mac OS X
--- chmod +x root-mac.sh
--- Run root-mac.sh

- Follow the on-screen instructions - watch both the computer and the device !

Note that if your device had not been unlocked before, this procedure will wipe all your data !

Are you having fastboot driver issues? You can find fastboot drivers in many places, but the easiest way is probably just installing the Android SDK.

Did you see the red Android logo during rooting, but SuperSU does not appear? This may sometimes occur due to left-over files and settings, however, you can usually install SuperSU from Google Play at this stage and it'll just work.

Not included - adbd Insecure
As this CF-Root does not include a custom kernel, adb shell does not have root access by default (you can still get it by typing su inside the shell), nor is adb remount supported, nor will adb push and adb pull work on system files. adbd Insecure can be used to remedy this situation. (No idea what this is about ? Don't worry about it !)

CF-Auto-Root homepage
http://autoroot.chainfire.eu/

CF-Auto-Root main thread
[CENTRAL] CF-Auto-Root
For requests for new roots and generic discussion - please keep device specific discussion in the thread you are viewing now.

 

Now, you should have yourself a nice shiny rooted Nexus 5.  Rooting a Nexus device is always pretty straight forward, and this one is no different.  Now that you are rooted... be aware of what you can do to your phone and take precautions every step of the way.  Disabling system applications can cause force close loops that will only be solved by a full restore (using factory images).  This is just one of the issues that an inexperienced root user could encounter.  If you have any questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to ask.  You don't want to brick your brand new Nexus do you?  :).  


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C Sab #3

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Posted Nov 4 '13 @ 5:00 PM

Well, if anyone had any questions about Rooting they won't after reading this.


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dmmarck #4

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Posted Nov 4 '13 @ 5:33 PM

Well, if anyone had any questions about Rooting they won't after reading this.

 

And if they do we're here to help :).  Customizing is a great passion of mine, but there's soooo much stuff out there to confuse.  I'm hoping we can clear up some of that nonsense, particularly with fastboot and what unlocking and rooting truly mean.


tacsig513.png

UNLEASH THE BEAST: General Nexus 5 Hackery


LG NEXUS 5 - Black 16GB, Android 4.4 KitKat, Unlocked, Rooted, franco.Kernel

ASUS NEXUS 7 (2013) - Black 16GB, Android 4.3 Jelly Bean, Unlocked

 


C Sab #5

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Posted Nov 4 '13 @ 6:10 PM

 

Well, if anyone had any questions about Rooting they won't after reading this.

 

And if they do we're here to help :).  Customizing is a great passion of mine, but there's soooo much stuff out there to confuse.  I'm hoping we can clear up some of that nonsense, particularly with fastboot and what unlocking and rooting truly mean.

 

DAT CUSTOMIZING! I'm the same way. Also, I'm sure it will all be made clear to everyone. :D


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Cyber Warrior #6

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Posted Nov 4 '13 @ 6:15 PM

Awesome guys.. great write up  B)


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dmmarck #7

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Posted Nov 4 '13 @ 8:23 PM

I have updated the OP with links to fastboot packages provided by our own @Cory Streater.  Please note the prefixes when inputting commands, as the prefix for the Mac version is different than the Windows version!

 

For example, on my MacBook Pro (I know, I know...), I use a fastboot package from late 2011 which contains "./fastboot-mac.exe"

 

So whenever I do a fastboot command on my Mac, my input looks like this:

$ ./fastboot-mac oem unlock

In these situations, using the ordinary prefix won't work, so be mindful of your fastboot.exe's filename!


tacsig513.png

UNLEASH THE BEAST: General Nexus 5 Hackery


LG NEXUS 5 - Black 16GB, Android 4.4 KitKat, Unlocked, Rooted, franco.Kernel

ASUS NEXUS 7 (2013) - Black 16GB, Android 4.3 Jelly Bean, Unlocked

 


Ahowe125 #8

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Posted Nov 5 '13 @ 8:05 AM

Very nice write ups, if a Nexus 5 were in my future I would be here reading note for note.. :-) 


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dmmarck #9

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Posted Nov 5 '13 @ 8:08 AM

Very nice write ups, if a Nexus 5 were in my future I would be here reading note for note.. :-) 

 

Appreciate that!

 

I have added a link to the universal USB drivers found on the Android SDK webpage.  If you have any issues, I recommend reading this guide.  All credit goes to the original author.


tacsig513.png

UNLEASH THE BEAST: General Nexus 5 Hackery


LG NEXUS 5 - Black 16GB, Android 4.4 KitKat, Unlocked, Rooted, franco.Kernel

ASUS NEXUS 7 (2013) - Black 16GB, Android 4.3 Jelly Bean, Unlocked

 


Empty Hand #10

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Posted Nov 7 '13 @ 5:48 PM

Finally have my N5 in hand and will be unlocking and rooting in a few hours when I get home.  One question is the various instructions for driver installation.  I know adb is working on my home computer, but I will obviously need to install the N5 drivers.  Is device driver installation no longer an automatic step that occurs when first plugging in the phone?  Or are the instructions to install the naked driver only needed in the event the drivers are not automatically installed?  I'm sure I can find this out once I get going, but I'm anxious and don't want to skip steps if it's just going to waste time in the end.  I'm also concerned because I plugged my gnex in yesterday to ensure everything was working properly on my computer, but fastboot could not find the device (which was not an issue the last time I tried a while back).  Thank you for the awsome guide (as always)!



dmmarck #11

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Posted Nov 7 '13 @ 7:08 PM

Finally have my N5 in hand and will be unlocking and rooting in a few hours when I get home.  One question is the various instructions for driver installation.  I know adb is working on my home computer, but I will obviously need to install the N5 drivers.  Is device driver installation no longer an automatic step that occurs when first plugging in the phone?  Or are the instructions to install the naked driver only needed in the event the drivers are not automatically installed?  I'm sure I can find this out once I get going, but I'm anxious and don't want to skip steps if it's just going to waste time in the end.  I'm also concerned because I plugged my gnex in yesterday to ensure everything was working properly on my computer, but fastboot could not find the device (which was not an issue the last time I tried a while back).  Thank you for the awsome guide (as always)!

 

I rarely use Windows computers for general hackery; I assume some drivers will download, the universal usually works.  However, I'd double check since I do all of my stuff on a Mac :).

(And a work machine that may or may not have the SDK...)


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tacsig513.png

UNLEASH THE BEAST: General Nexus 5 Hackery


LG NEXUS 5 - Black 16GB, Android 4.4 KitKat, Unlocked, Rooted, franco.Kernel

ASUS NEXUS 7 (2013) - Black 16GB, Android 4.3 Jelly Bean, Unlocked